Diabetes & Endocrinology

Some Books available in the library

  • ABC of diabetes
  • Best of five MCQS for the endocrinology and diabetes SCE
  •  Care of people with diabetes: a manual for nursing practice
  •  Diabetes and its management
  •  Endocrine surgery: a companion to specialist surgical practice
  •  Essential endocrinology and diabetes
  •  Lecture notes on endocrinology and diabetes
  • Mosby’s color atlas and text of diabetes and endocrinology
  • Oxford handbook of endocrinology and diabetes
  • Specialist training in endocrinology

Search the Library Catalogue for more Diabetes books

Big4 Medical Journals

DynaMed Plus Diabetes & Endocrinology Topics  (If you are not using Trust computer login with your OpenAthens)

Clinical Knowledge Summaries – Endocrine and Metabolic Topics

Recent articles from selected Journal RSS feeds 

BMC Endocrine Disorders (Open Access)

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Cardiovascular Diabetology (Open Access)

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Clinical Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

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Diabetes and Primary Care  (Full-text not available)

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Diabetic Medicine (Full-text not available)

Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders (Open Access)

Abstract

Purpose

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is highly heritable and exhibits significant variability in prevalence between different populations. Prevalence of T2DM is higher in Asian and African relative to European populations. During evolution, traditional feast-famine cycles likely led to significant natural selection impacting metabolic genes. Human adaptation to environmental changes (food supply, lifestyle, climate, and geography) likely influenced differential selection of T2DM-associated genes. Together, insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 (IRS1 and IRS2) genes encode the major ligands of insulin and IGF1 receptors. Irs2-deficient mice exhibit a T2DM phenotype with severe insulin resistance, and a common IRS2 polymorphism is associated with T2DM. Therefore, the present study sought evidence of natural selection at IRS2 loci.

Methods

Data were sourced from the HapMap and 1000 Genomes projects, comprising four different populations with distinct ancestries: European, Yoruba, Han Chinese, and Japanese. A three-step method was applied to detect IRS2 locus selection. The long-range haplotype (LRH) test detected unusual extended haplotypes, the integrated haplotype score (iHS) detected selection, and Wright’s F-statistics (particularly Wright’s fixation index: FST) were calculated as a measure of population differentiation.

Results

The African population exhibited highly significant LRH findings (percentile >99.9, p = 0.005–0.0009), while both the European and African populations exhibited extreme positive iHS test scores ([iHS] >2.5).

Conclusion

These findings indicate that genetic selection has occurred at the IRS2 locus, warranting further research into the adaptive evolution of metabolic disorder-associated genes.

Abstract

Objectives

Osteoporosis is characterized by slow deterioration in bone mass and disruption of its structure, leading to an increased risk of bone fractures. Gut microbiota plays an important role in the transport and absorption of nutrients needed for bone health. Akkermansia muciniphila is one of the gut microbiota members that its beneficial role in prevention of metabolic disorder was suggested. The aim of the current pilot study was the assessment of fecal A. muciniphila in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia.

Methods

A total of 36 subjects including eight with osteoporosis (three men and five women), eight with osteopenia (two men and six women), and 20 normal controls (six men and 14 women) were selected. Microbial genome was extracted from fresh stool samples. The bacterial load was determined by quantitative real-time PCR using 16S rRNA specific primers.

Results

The participants’ mean age in the osteoporosis, osteopenia and control groups were 61.71, 45 and 45.05 years, respectively. The majority of osteoporosis patients were post-menopause women, while in osteopenia group was pre-menopause. There were significant differences in terms of age, T-score, Z-score, and menopause among groups (P value < 0.05). The presence of A. muciniphila was higher in the healthy group compared to osteopenia group; however, these differences were not statistically significant.

Conclusions

In conclusion, however, there was no statistically significant difference between the study groups; it seems that the load of A. muciniphila may be related to bone health. Further in vivo and in vitro studies are needed to investigate the immunological and biochemical pathways.

Abstract

Background

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was one of chronic disease that remain global concern including in Indonesia. Healthy lifestyle is a part of diabetes mellitus treatment to achieve the highest health status and to prevent diabetes complication. Purpose: This study aimed to examine the effect of community and peer support based healthy lifestyle program (CP-HELP) on self-care behavior and fasting blood glucose in patient with T2DM. Methods: The research design was used quasi experimental pre and post-test design. 163 participants with T2DM were divided into two groups, 83 participants as intervention group were given CP-HELP intervention and 80 participants as control group were given usual care. Measurement of self-care behavior used Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ). Furthermore, measurement of fasting blood glucose was measured by capillary blood test. This study was used paired t test and multivariate analysis of variance. Results: An increase of mean value of self-care behavior was occurred in both of group intervention and control. A significant different between pre-test and post-test in intervention group (p = 0.000). Results of statistical test used paired t test in control group, was not showed significantly different (p = 0.249). Improved of fasting blood glucose only occurred in intervention group (p = 0.020). Results of multivariate statistic test was showed in both outcomes obtained significant value less than 0.05, self-care behavior (p = 0.010), fasting blood glucose (p = 0.042). Conclusion: CP-HELP may be a promising interventional strategy to improve self-care behavior and improving of fasting blood glucose in patient with T2DM. The research results can be used as an important reference for improving self care behavior and fasting blood glucose in patient with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract

Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of death globally, imposing a heavy burden on the healthcare systems, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Iran is a country in the Middle-East region with an aging population and changing disease risk factors, and now is facing NCDs as the major health problem of the country. Investigating NCDs’ risk factors and tackling preventable ones is the main intervention to control their heavy burden. In this review, we discussed the most critical risk factors in Iran and the implemented programs and action plans to control them. A better knowledge on current status of risk factors and plans to tackle them, could help policymakers effectively rule policies and allocate resources to curb heavy burden of NCDs in Iran.

Abstract

The concomitant use of various types of models (in silico, in vitro, and in vivo) has been exemplified here within the context of biomedical researches performed in the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute (EMRI) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Two main research aeras have been discussed: the search for new small molecules as therapeutics for diabetes and related metabolic conditions, and diseases related to protein aggregation. Due to their multidisciplinary nature, the majority of these studies have needed the collaboration of different specialties. In both cases, a brief overview of the subject is provided through literature examples, and sequential use of these methods is described.

Abstract

Purpose

Infertility is one of the systemic problems in diabetic men. The purpose of the present study is investigation of the effects of the Alpinia officinarum (AO) hydro-alcoholic extract on the reproductive system damages in diabetic male rats.

Methods

Twenty four male rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n = 6); i.e., control, diabetic control, and diabetic rats treated orally with AO extract (200 and 500 mg kg−1). A single dose (60 mg kg-1) of streptozotocin (STZ) was injected intraperitoneally (IP) to induce diabetes. After 8 weeks of treatment, blood samples, testis, and cauda epididymis were excised to evaluate specific hormonal changes, sperm parameters, and testis morphology.

Results

Diabetic control rats showed remarkably lower body and testicular weights, testicular volumes, and sperm parameters compared with the control group (p <0.05). Diabetic control rats also exhibited significantly decreased serum testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Sperm parameters were considerably enhanced in diabetic animals gavaged with AO extract. Testosterone levels were significantly elevated by administrating 500 mg kg−1AO extract to the diabetic control rats (p <0.05). The morphological assessment of testis of treatment group (500 mg kg−1) indicated remarkable differences (p <0.05) by increasing the seminiferous tubules diameter (STD) and thickness of the seminiferous epithelium (TSE) compared with diabetic control rats.

Conclusion

As demonstrated by the results, AO extract ameliorated sperm damage and improved sperm morphology besides improving histological damage in the testis in diabetic rats. In addition, the dose of 500 mg kg−1 worked more efficiently than 200 mg kg−1.

Abstract

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) accounts for up to a third of all new presentations of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) in children and adolescents. While most cases are relatively uncomplicated new onset presentations, if DKA is compounded with an additional underlying severe illness, such as appendicitis or severe infection, diagnostic delays may be experienced, and treatment response and outcomes may be compromised. We report an atypical case of new onset diabetes with severe DKA and underlying severe sepsis, which responded poorly to traditional therapy resulting in maximal intensive care management including mechanical ventilation, inotropes, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for cardiorespiratory support, and kidney replacement therapy.

Abstract

Background

Nutrition plays a pivotal role in the prevention and treatment of endocrine disorders. The aim of this study was to provide a window in order to display the 25-year activities of Endocrinology & Metabolism Research Institute (EMRI), and the gaps and future plans in the field of nutrition and endocrine disorders.

Methods

To collect papers affiliated to the EMRI in field of nutrition from the inception to December 1st 2019, the electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. Publications in English and Persian languages were included. Scientific Landscapes (VOS viewer) software version 1.6.13 was used to provide bibliometric maps.

Results

Of 4082 studies identified in the initial search, 319 relevant papers were included. They contributed systematic review and meta-analysis/review (n = 76), clinical trials (n = 58), cross-sectional (n = 171), case-control studies (n = 11), and animal studies (n = 3). Accordingly, most nutrition studies were dedicated to the level of evidence III (cross-sectional studies: 53.60%) followed by systematic review studies (23.82%) with the level of evidence I. There was also an increasing trend in the nutrition studies through years, with a peak in 2019.

Conclusion

An increasing trend in the publications related to nutrition science is observed at EMRI. However, nutrition research and publications can grow further through expanding collaborations with other fields related to endocrine. Given nutritional assessments in national projects and focusing on the identification of preventive nutritional strategies, considering the situations of our society can be helpful to make nutritional findings more practical.

Abstract

Objective

This study designed to discover the link between a body shape index (ABSI) and hip index (HI) with cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) in Iranian children and adolescents.

Subjects and methods

In a nationwide cross-sectional survey, 4200 students who were 7–18 years old were chosen via a multistage cluster sampling method in 30 provinces of Iran in 2015. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was defined in line with the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. ABSI and HI were defined as waist circumference (m)/ [body mass index 2/3 * height (m)1/2] and hip circumference (cm) *(height/ 166 cm)0.310 *(weight / 73 kg)−0.482 respectively. Association between ABSI and HI with CMRFs as categorical and continuous variables were evaluated using multivariable logistic and linear regression analysis respectively.

Results

Totally, information of 14,002 students and findings of blood samples of 3483 of them were involved in the current study. In the multivariable logistic regression, an association of HI with high triglyceride (TG) (OR: 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.98–0.99) and ABSI with MetS (OR: 11.41, 2.61–49.88) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Also, both indices were significantly associated with overweight, generalized, and abdominal obesity. In the multivariable linear regression analysis, increasing HI (per one unit) was associated with body mass index z-score (z-BMI) (β: -0.01), waist circumference (WC) (β: 0.15), TG (β: -0.16), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (β: -0.02). Moreover, in the multivariable linear models, ABSI was significantly associated with z-BMI, WC, SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001).

Conclusions

ABSI and HI as novel body shape indices were significantly associated with some CMRFs. Therefore, these indices can be used as some useful anthropometric risk indices for predicting MetS.

Journal of  Diabetes Nursing (Full-text not available)

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Reproductive Biology & Endocrinology (Open Access)

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