Diabetes & Endocrinology

Some Books available in the library

  • ABC of diabetes
  • Best of five MCQS for the endocrinology and diabetes SCE
  •  Care of people with diabetes: a manual for nursing practice
  •  Diabetes and its management
  •  Endocrine surgery: a companion to specialist surgical practice
  •  Essential endocrinology and diabetes
  •  Lecture notes on endocrinology and diabetes
  • Mosby’s color atlas and text of diabetes and endocrinology
  • Oxford handbook of endocrinology and diabetes
  • Specialist training in endocrinology

Search the Library Catalogue for more Diabetes books

Big4 Medical Journals

DynaMed Plus Diabetes & Endocrinology Topics  (If you are not using Trust computer login with your OpenAthens)

Clinical Knowledge Summaries – Endocrine and Metabolic Topics

Recent articles from selected Journal RSS feeds 

BMC Endocrine Disorders (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

Cardiovascular Diabetology (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

Clinical Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

Viewing page 1 of 6|Next Page

Diabetes and Primary Care  (Full-text not available)

Viewing page 1 of 21|Next Page

Diabetic Medicine (Full-text not available)

Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders (Open Access)

Abstract

Purpose

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most important neurodegenerative diseases and accompanied by the production of free radicals and inflammatory factors. Studies have shown that p-cymene has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Here, the effects of this compound were investigated on a rat model of AD.

Methods

In order to create Alzheimer’s rat model, bilateral injection of Amyloid β1–42 (Aβ1–42) into rats hippocampus was performed. Both therapeutic (post-AD induction) and preventive effects of p-cymene consumption with doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg were investigated. In addition, the effects of adding short-term exercise to the process were also observed. In vitro, Aβ1–42 peptide was driven toward fibril formation and effect of p-cymene was observed on the resulting fibrils.

Results

Learning and memory indices in the AD rats were significantly reduced compared to the Sham group, while p-cymene consumption with both doses, as well as performing exercise counteracted AD consequences. Moreover, increased neurogenesis and reduced amyloid plaques counts were observed in treated rats. In vitro formed fibrils of Aβ1–42 were partially disaggregated in the presence of p-cymene.

Discussion

p-Cymene could act on this AD model via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as well as direct anti-fibril effect.

Conclusion

p-cymene can improve AD-related disorders including memory impairment.

Abstract

With the COVID-19 pandemic causing huge threat to public health and definite treatment modalities and preventive vaccines yet to be arrived at, some of the key indicators of relevance to its prognosis have started emerging. One such independent predictor of outcome has been fasting plasma glucose (FPG) at the time of admission. Earlier, co-morbidities such as diabetes also have been reported to have a risk of relatively increased mortality due to COVID-19. In this background, we herein report on the beneficial effects of Biological response modifier glucan (BRMG) secreted by the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans AFO-202 which has been proven to bring under control blood sugar levels in human subjects and also has potential in enhancing & regulating the immune parameters in relevance to COVID-19. We further recommend that this BRMG be tried in clinical studies of COVID-19 to provide a prophylactic effect for validation.

Abstract

Iran is a developing country facing demographic transition. Cancers are among the major non-communicable disorders with remarkable budern on the health-care governing systems. Extended life expectancy of Iranian population, change in living style, as well as promoted diagnostic and treatment methods have resulted into significant malignancies emergence and detection. Understanding the trend of this epidemiologic transition is required for proper allotment of resources. In this manuscript, overall epidemiologic pattern of cancers and their burden transition is reviewed. In addition, more concerning neoplasia (gastrointestinal, breast, thyroid, urologic, and respiratory system cancers) are reviewed in more details.

Abstract

Purpose

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by having a multitude of life-threatening secondary complications, particularly dyslipidemia, which ultimately leads to the development of comorbid diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases. This research work was designed to investigate the synergistic effect of glimepiride (1 mg/kg b.w.) and rosuvastatin (10 mg /kg b.w.) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats having dyslipidemia.

Methods

Diabetes was induced by injecting alloxan (120 mg/kg b.w.) intraperitoneally. The experiment was conducted to determine the level of blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile, and body weight variation of rats.

Results

This study’s outcomes suggested that the combination therapy showed more statistically significant effect on blood glucose level, HbA1c level, lipid profile, and body weight variation than any single therapy. While the glimepiride monotherapy showed a statistically considerable effect on blood glucose level, HbA1c level, and body weight variation, the rosuvastatin treated group gave statistically non-significant effect on these parameters except body weight variation, which was found as downward trend. In addition, the rosuvastatin treated group showed a healthy lipid profile compared to glimepiride treated group.

Conclusions

Concluding the results of this study, it can be said that the treatment of glimepiride in combination with rosuvastatin may be more efficacious than monotherapy for preventing diabetes in rats with dyslipidemia.

Abstract

Introduction

Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease and a global epidemic. It is a known fact that co-morbidities, including Diabetes Mellitus, pose a higher risk of infection by COVID-19. Additionally, the outcomes following infection are far worse than in people without such co-morbities.

Factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have long been established, yet this disease still bestows a substantial global burden. The aim was to provide a comprehensive review of the burden of diabetes pre-COVID-19 and the additional impact sustained by the diabetes population and healthcare systems during the COVID-19 pandemic, while providing recommendations of how this burden can be subsided.

Methodology

Literature searches were carried out on ‘Google Scholar’ and ‘PubMed’ to identify relevant articles for the scope of this review. Information was also collected from reliable sources such as the World Health Organisation and the International Diabetes Federation.

Results

T2DM presented with economic, social and health burdens prior to COVID-19 with an significant ‘Disability Adjusted Life Years’ impact. Whilst people with diabetes are more susceptible to COVID-19, enforcing lockdown regulations set by the Public Health department to reduce risk of infection brought about its own challenges to T2DM management. Through recommendations and adapting to new methods of management such as telehealth, these challenges and potential consequences of mismanagement are kept to a minimum whilst safeguarding the healthcare system.

Conclusion

By understanding the challenges and burdens faced by this population both evident pre-covid and during, targeted healthcare can be provided during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, implementation of targeted action plans and recommendations ensures the care provided is done in a safe and effective environment.

Abstract

Background

Traditionally, Ficus benghalensis L. is used to treat metabolic disorders and is also recorded in the Ayurvedic pharmacopeia of India. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-diabetic property of hydroalcoholic extract/fraction(s) of F. benghalensis L. bark via in silico, in vitro, and ex vivo approach.

Methods

Enzyme inhibitory activity, glucose uptake in rat hemidiaphragm, and glucose permeability, and adsorption assays were performed using in vitro and ex vivo methods as applicable. Further, the PASS was used to identify the probable lead enzyme inhibitors. The presence of predicted enzyme inhibitors was confirmed via the LC-MS. Similarly, the docking of ligands with respective targets was performed using autodock4.0.

Results

Flavonoids rich fraction possessed the highest α-amylase, and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity followed by maximum efficacy for glucose uptake in rat hemidiaphragm. Similarly, the hydroalcoholic extract showed the highest efficacy to inhibit glucose diffusion. Likewise, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid was predicted for the highest pharmacological activity for α-amylase, ursolic acid for PTP1B, and apigenin for α-glucosidase inhibition respectively. The LC-MS analysis also identified the presence of the above hit molecules in the hydroalcoholic extract.

Conclusion

The analogs of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, apigenin, and ursolic acid could be the choice of lead hits as the α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and PTP1B inhibitors respectively. Additionally, the majority of secondary metabolites from the hydroalcoholic extract of F. benghalensis may be involved in enhancing the glucose uptake to support the process of glycogenesis.

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) augments the risk of hospitalization and mortality resulting from viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogen infection. This has been also true for the past SARS and MERS, and current SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus epidemics. Clinical data indicate that SARS-CoV-2 infection triggers a severe course of COVID-19 more frequently in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Here we overview the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. We focus on alterations in the immune cells, especially monocytes and macrophages, involved in innate immune response and inflammatory processes, which differ in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We also describe the DM-related changes in the monocyte/macrophages functions, how they could lead to the severe outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and importantly, if and how they could initiate DM in DM-susceptible patients.

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a common lifestyle disease which can be classified into type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. While both result in hyperglycemia due to lack of insulin action and further associated chronic ailments, there is a marked distinction in the cause for each type due to which both require a different prophylaxis. As observed, type 1 diabetes is caused due to the autoimmune action of the body resulting in the destruction of pancreatic islet cells. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is caused either due to insulin resistance of target cells or lack of insulin production as per physiological requirements. Attempts to cure the disease have been made by bringing drastic changes in the patients’ lifestyle; parenteral administration of insulin; prescription of drugs such as biguanides, meglitinides, and amylin; pancreatic transplantation; and immunotherapy. While these attempts cause a certain degree of relief to the patient, none of these can cure diabetes mellitus. However, a new treatment strategy led by the discovery of mesenchymal stem cells and their unique immunomodulatory and multipotent properties has inspired therapies to treat diabetes by essentially reversing the conditions causing the disease. The current review aims to enumerate the role of various mesenchymal stem cells and the different approaches to treat both types of diabetes and its associated diseases as well.

Abstract

Purpose

Hypertriglyceridemia (HG) is an independent risk factor with more prevalence than hypercholesterolemia and its attributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and pancreatitis. Hence, it becomes imperative to search for new triglyceride (TG) lowering agents. Tinospora cordifolia (TC) is a well-known Ayurvedic drug and a rich source of protoberberine alkaloids hence can contribute to TG lowering without side effects. Hence, to explore the therapeutic efficacy of T. cordifolia and its effects on biochemistry and metabolome in the patients of hyper-triglyceridemia, clinical trials were conducted.

Methods

Patients (n = 24) with hypertriglyceridemia were randomized into two groups to receive T. cordifolia extract (TCE) (3.0 g/per day) and metformin (850 mg/day) for 14 days having >300 mg/dl triglyceride level and cholesterol in the range of 130–230 mg/dl. Lipid profiles of blood samples were analyzed. Urine samples were subjected to HPLC-QTOF-MS to quantify oxidative damage and abnormal metabolic regulation.

Results

Intervention with TCE reduced the triglyceride, LDL, and VLDL levels to 380.45 ± 17.44, 133.25 ± 3.18, and 31.85 ± 5.88 mg/dL and increased the HDL to 47.50 ± 9.05 mg/dL significantly (p < 0.05) in the HG patients after 14 days treatment. TCE dosage potently suppressed the inflammatory and oxidative stress marker’s i.e. levels of isoprostanes significantly (p < 0.01). Qualitative metabolomics approach i.e. PCA and PLS-DA showed significant alterations (p < 0.05) in the levels of 40 metabolites in the urine samples from different groups.

Conclusion

TCE administration depleted the levels of markers of HG i.e. VLDL, TG, and LDL significantly. Metabolomics studies established that the anti-HG activity of TCE was due to its antioxidative potential and modulation of the biopterin, butanoate, amino acid, and vitamin metabolism.

Clinical trials registry

India (CTRI) registration no. CTRI- 2016-08-007187.

Journal of  Diabetes Nursing (Full-text not available)

Viewing page 1 of 21|Next Page

Reproductive Biology & Endocrinology (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

If you have any comments/suggestions about this page or would like to add more feeds to this specialty please email: uma.devalapalli@chelwest.nhs.uk

Library News

Image result for new Library Discovery Tool

Check out our guide for a brief overview, how to access and use the Discovery tool. Trouble accessing or have questions?  Please contact us

BMJ Best Practice, clinical decision support tool is now available. Access it on the Trust intranet without any password, to access remotely login with NHS OpenAthens, download the app to access on mobile devices anywhere. See the  user guide for details.

BBC News- Health

The NHS wants us to donate blood plasma to help fight Covid-19. But why?
As the second wave of the pandemic takes deep root across parts of the UK, thousands of NHS workers are struggling to recover from what they have already been through.
Explore the data on coronavirus in the UK and find out how many cases there are in your area.
The highest levels continue to be in the north of England, says the Office for National Statistics.
An alert issued via the app will not mean the recipient can claim a payment for self-isolating.

Accessing Articles
Articles from journals marked in green are freely available or available in print in the library, or are available by using your NHS Athens account. You may need to click on 'Log in with Athens' to get an Athens login box.

If you don't have an NHS Athens account, you can register online, and if you do this on an NHS PC, you'll receive a confirmation email the same day.

Journals marked in orange aren't available online, but we hold print copies in the Library.

Journals marked in red aren't available online or in the Library but we can order articles  via our Inter Library Loan Service. There is a small charge for this. Please contact the library on ext 5968 or email Library.InfoService@chelwest.nhs.uk  for more information.

Quick Links
qrcode.14118297[1]