Diabetes & Endocrinology

Some Books available in the library

  • ABC of diabetes
  • Best of five MCQS for the endocrinology and diabetes SCE
  •  Care of people with diabetes: a manual for nursing practice
  •  Diabetes and its management
  •  Endocrine surgery: a companion to specialist surgical practice
  •  Essential endocrinology and diabetes
  •  Lecture notes on endocrinology and diabetes
  • Mosby’s color atlas and text of diabetes and endocrinology
  • Oxford handbook of endocrinology and diabetes
  • Specialist training in endocrinology

Search the Library Catalogue for more Diabetes books

Big4 Medical Journals

DynaMed Plus Diabetes & Endocrinology Topics  (If you are not using Trust computer login with your OpenAthens)

Clinical Knowledge Summaries – Endocrine and Metabolic Topics

Recent articles from selected Journal RSS feeds 

BMC Endocrine Disorders (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

Cardiovascular Diabetology (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

Clinical Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

Diabetes (Full-text available via NHS Athens)

Viewing page 1 of 4|Next Page

Diabetes and Primary Care  (Full-text not available)

Viewing page 1 of 21|Next Page

Diabetic Medicine (Full-text not available)

Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders (Open Access)

Abstract

Purpose

In order to counteract the obesity has epidemics, since current anti-obesity drugs effects remain limited, there is a need to provide new options. As a project aiming to assess potential anti obesity natural compounds, the effects of consumption of a minimal dose of green tea hydro alcoholic extract (GT) on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3L1 cell line were investigated.

Methods

Obesity was induced in female NMRI mice (which are less used overall) by the use of a high fat diet. Mice were divided into four groups of control (C), treated control (TC), obese (O) and treated obese (TO). TC and TO groups received 8 mg/Kg/day of GT for 8 weeks, and weighted weekly, after what biochemical and histological parameters were measured. GT was used at doses of 100,150 and 200 µg/ml on 3T3L1, and staining with Oil-red-O was done for estimation of fat droplet accumulation.

Results

Body weight was found to be affected significantly by GT. Blood glucose levels did not show significant changes between groups, while triglycerides levels of the O group was significantly higher than the C group, but the TO group showed no significant difference with the C group upon GT treatment. Liver and visceral fat tissues showed more normalized tissue and less fat accumulation in the TO group. TO and TC groups showed an ameliorated morphologic state of liver tissues. GT was also able to decrease fat droplet formation in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusions

Adding a minimal amount of GT to the daily consumption may have preventive effects on fat accumulation in healthy subjects, while in obese cases, GT shows significant therapeutic effect.

Abstract

Purpose

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic non-communicable endocrine and metabolic disease that is thought to be the fastest emerging health challenge of the twenty-first century. Presently, 90% of diabetic population is handicapped with T2-DM, and the majority of pre-diabetes on the way to T2-DM progression. By keeping in view, a review article has been compiled to highlight the significance of value aided effective, low-cost, safe, and useful remedies that could easily be accessible to the global community in order to moderate the possibility of DM and related complications.

Methods

Literature search for this review was carried out using scientific databases including PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus, Web of science, and google scholar. Whilst, value aided articles were selected on the basis of their therapeutic potential, safety profile and outreach.

Results

Escalating research data validated that herbal remedies and physical activities significantly prevents hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and other complications in people with T2-DM.

Conclusion

Globally, nearly half-billion individuals are living with diabetes. Therefore, it is urged to embrace herbal remedies and physical mediation in our daily routine in order to tackle such devastating disorder.

Abstract

Background

Psychological flexibility has considerable effects on medical and psychosocial outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Persian versions of the Acceptance and Action Diabetes Questionnaire (AADQ) and the Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for children and adolescents (DAAS), the measures of diabetes-specific psychological flexibility.

Methods

196 youth with T1DM completed the DAAS, AADQ (youth-report), Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM), Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents (ERQ-CA), and the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youths (AFQ-Y8). Also, their parents completed AADQ (parent-report). Data analyzed by SPSS V.26 and LISREL 8.8.

Results

The mean and standard deviation of participants’ age was 14.7 ± 2.08.The internal consistency due to Cronbach’s alpha method was 0.87, 0.8, 0.84, and 0.83 for DAAS total scores, avoidance, values impairment, and fusion, respectively. The internal consistency of AADQ (both parent-report and youth report) was above 0.8. Test-retest reliability (from 45 participants) with a one-week interval was assessed by the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The DAAS, AADQ-parent report, and AADQ-youth report’s reliability coefficients were 0.93, 0.82, and 0.92, respectively. The AADQ (both forms) and DAAS evidence good content validity based on correlations with other measures. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) showed DAAS has the three-factor model, which strongly a suitable model is fitting. EFA also verified the AADQ model fitting.

Conclusions

In general, these results support the psychometric properties of the Persian versions of DAAS and AADQ among the Iranian youth patients with T1DM.

Abstract

Introduction

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder that has serious complications. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is more widespread worldwide and in Egypt. Interleukin-16 is a pro-inflammatory factor that can lead to many inflammatory diseases by stimulating the secretions of cytokines. Inflammation and obesity are concomitant factors that may lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we tried to focus on the relation between Interleukin-16 rs11556218 polymorphism and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Patients and methods

128 type 2 diabetic patients and 128 healthy individuals as control were included in this case-control study. Interleukin-16 gene polymorphism (SNP rs11556218 T/G) was genotyped using a real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results

Interleukin-16 rs11556218 T/G gene polymorphism has a statistically significant association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the co-dominant, dominant and, over dominant genetic models. The genotype TG was presented in approximately 30 % of diabetic patients vs. control (p = 0.04) and patients with TG genotype have a 1.8 times higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR1.87; 95 % CI = 1.04 to 3.39) and 9.5 times higher after risk-adjusted diabetes (OR9.58; 95 % CI = 1.50 to 61.25) (p = 0.031). We found an association between Interleukin-16 gene polymorphism with both body mass index and high density lipoprotein.

Conclusion

This study is the first one in the Middle East and Africa which found a correlation between Interleukin-16 gene polymorphism rs11556218 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Egyptians with TG genotypes have a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Abstract

Background

Nowadays, use of continuous metabolic syndrome (cMetS) score has been suggested to improve recognition of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of cMetS scores for predicting MetS.

Methods

We searched the electronic databases included MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus from 1 January 1980 to 30 September 2020. Observational studies on participants with different cMetS scores were included in this meta-analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with 95% CI were calculated.

Results

Ten studies involving a total of 25,073 participants were included. All studies had cross-sectional design. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of cMetS scores for predicting MetS were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.83 to 0.95) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83 to 0.89), respectively. Moreover, cMetS scores had the pooled LR+ of 6.5 (95% CI: 5.0 to 8.6), and a pooled (LR-) of 0.11 (95% CI: 0.063 to 0.21). The pooled DOR of cMetS scores to predict MetS were 57 (95% CI: 26 to 127).

Conclusions

The high sensitivity and specificity of cMetS scores indicates that it has a high accuracy to predict the risk of MetS. Furthermore, the cMetS scores has a good ability to rule out healthy people.

Study registration

This study was registered as PROSPERO CRD42020157273.

Abstract

A systematic review (SR) is a type of review that uses a systematic method to provide a valid summary of existing literature addressing a clear and specific question. In clinical medicine (CM), the concept of SR is well recognized, especially after the introduction of evidence-based medicine; The SR of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is considered the highest level of evidence on therapeutic effectiveness. Despite the popularity of the SRs and the increasing publication rate of SRs in CM and other healthcare literature, the concept has raised criticisms. Many of proper criticisms can be due to the deviation of some existing SRs from the original philosophy and well-established rationale behind the concept of SR. On the other hand, many criticisms are misconceptions about SRs which still exist even several decades after introducing the concept. This article presents a conceptual framework for clarifying the rationale behind SR in CM by providing the relevant concepts and their inter-relations, explaining how methodological standards of an SR and its rationale are connected, and discussing the rationale under the three-section: SR as a type of synthetic research, SR as a more informed and less biased review, and SR as an efficient scientific tool.

Abstract

Purpose

To assess Self-care and related factors in patients with type II diabetes in Iran.

Methods

This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients with type II diabetes who were referred to specialized diabetes centers related to Arak University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three parts (the first part was demographic information, the second part was self-care behaviors such as diet, exercise, control, treatment, and prevention of complications over the past seven days, and the third part was factors influencing patients’ self-care behaviors). The inclusion criteria were; patients 18–80 years of age with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, at least one year passed of diabetes diagnosis, no chronic diseases other than those related to diabetes, had awareness of the diagnosis, had no hearing and speech impairments, and no mental illnesses. The exclusion criteria was the patient’s failure to answer all questions of the questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16, and using descriptive statistics and Pearson test, independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Spearman test.

Results

The mean score of self-care in patients was 84.41 ± 11.75 and at the intermediate level. Spearman correlation coefficient test results showed a significant relationship between self-care behavior and gender (p = 0.001), and insurance type (p = 0.035). Also, men had higher average self-care compared to women (p = 0.001). The highest average score of self-care was in Adherence to medication and the lowest score was in exercise and physical activity.

Conclusion

Due to the low self-care score in exercise and physical activity and the lack of periodic renal examinations, planning and educational interventions in all aspects of self-care, especially in terms of sports and physical activity, and periodic renal examinations are essential.

Abstract

Objectives

According to the recent epidemiological studies, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may be at higher risk of hospitalization due to COVID-19. Regarding the important role of nutrition on the immunity, the present review article aimed to outline nutritional support of DM during the outbreak of COVID-19 with a mechanistic insight.

Methods

Searches were performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases from 2000 until December 2020 using the following keywords. All relevant clinical and experimental studies published in English were included.

Results

Evidences revealed that hyperglycemia is a significant predictor of some viral infections including COVID-19 which can exacerbate the complications of DM. According to the literature review, adequate intake of dietary protein, fiber, essential fatty acids and some micronutrients especially vitamins D, C, B12, folate, zinc and selenium has beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 in diabetic patients through modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses or direct effects on virus enzymes or the rate of cell entrance.

Conclusions

It is well understood that malnutrition may increase susceptibility to viral infections and disease progression. Therefore, considering nutritional status of diabetic patients and reasonable supplementation of the above mentioned nutrients can ameliorate the symptoms of COVID-19 in DM. However, further well-designed clinical trials are needed to determine their therapeutic dose.

Abstract

Biobanking as an emerging procedure referring to the development of sample storage technologies which provide essential structures for conducting research. This paper presents the experiences and challenges faced while establishing the non-communicable diseases (NCDs)-dedicated biobank at Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute (EMRI) in Iran, such as infrastructure, Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS), ethical and legal aspects, sample collection, preservation, and quality control (QC). NCDs are a major health problem around the world and in Iran, which is access to biological samples are required to understanding and planning to these diseases. The main objectives of the EMRI biobank is currently the collection and storage of biological samples such as blood, serum, plasma, urine and DNA from patients with NCDs including diabetes mellitus osteoporosis and elderly population based on cohort and cross-sectional studies. The biobank of EMRI aims to have a major impact on the NCDs by supplying biological samples for national and international research projects.

Journal of  Diabetes Nursing (Full-text not available)

Viewing page 1 of 21|Next Page

Reproductive Biology & Endocrinology (Open Access)

Viewing page 1 of 1

If you have any comments/suggestions about this page or would like to add more feeds to this specialty please email: uma.devalapalli@chelwest.nhs.uk

Library News

Image result for new Library Discovery Tool

Check out our guide for a brief overview, how to access and use the Discovery tool. Trouble accessing or have questions?  Please contact us

BMJ Best Practice, clinical decision support tool is now available. Access it on the Trust intranet without any password, to access remotely login with NHS OpenAthens, download the app to access on mobile devices anywhere. See the  user guide for details.

BBC News- Health

Explore the data on coronavirus in the UK and find out how many cases there are in your area.
A rapid review of US patients says people being vaccinated should be reassured by the findings.
Helen Whitelaw appeared on Tipping Point before Motor Neurone Disease rendered her speechless.
The February figures show the numbers waiting over a year for surgery continued to rise sharply.
Everyone in England is being encouraged to take two rapid coronavirus tests a week.

Accessing Articles
Articles from journals marked in green are freely available or available in print in the library, or are available by using your NHS Athens account. You may need to click on 'Log in with Athens' to get an Athens login box.

If you don't have an NHS Athens account, you can register online, and if you do this on an NHS PC, you'll receive a confirmation email the same day.

Journals marked in orange aren't available online, but we hold print copies in the Library.

Journals marked in red aren't available online or in the Library but we can order articles  via our Inter Library Loan Service. There is a small charge for this. Please contact the library on ext 5968 or email Library.InfoService@chelwest.nhs.uk  for more information.

Quick Links
qrcode.14118297[1]