Respiratory Function Tests

Related Articles

[Heterogeneity of airway macrophage in different clinical phenotypes of COPD patients with frequent or infrequent exacerbations].

Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban. 2019 Dec 28;44(12):1376-1384

Authors: Chen X, Tang Y, Wang W, Zhu Y

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical features and the heterogeneity of macrophages in different clinical phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with frequent or infrequent exacerbations.
 Methods: Clinical characteristics of eighty COPD patients with chronic bronchitis (CB), emphysema (EM) or asthma-COPD overlap (ACO) phenotypes suffered from acute exacerbation were analyzed. The expressions of CCL3 and CD163 in sputum macrophages were detected by flow cytometry. The expressions of HIF-1α and Cav-1 in sputum macrophages were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR).
 Results: The age, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC), sputum bacteria positive rate, COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score, and Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) score between the patients with FE and iFE were significantly different (P<0.05). Compared with iFE patients, the fluorescence intensity of CCL3 in sputum macrophages from patients with FE was significantly lower (P<0.01), while CD163 was significantly increased (P<0.01). Meanwhile, HIF-1α and Cav-1 mRNA levels were also significantly increased (P<0.01). The age, sputum bacteria positive rate, CAT score, and mMRC score between the patients of FE and iFE with CB phenotype were significantly different (P<0.05). Compared with iFE patients, the fluorescence intensity of CCL3 in sputum macrophages from FE patients was slightly decreased (P<0.05), while CD163 was significantly raised (P<0.01). Meanwhile, HIF-1α and Cav-1 mRNA levels were also significantly increased (P<0.01). The age, duration of disease, FEV1/FVC, sputum bacteria positive rate, CAT score, and mMRC score between the patients of FE and iFE with EM phenotype were significantly different (P<0.05). Compared with iFE patients, the fluorescence intensity of CCL3 in sputum macrophages from FE patients was slightly decreased (P>0.05), while CD163 was slightly raised (P>0.05). Meanwhile, HIF-1α levels were slightly elevated (P>0.05), while Cav-1 expression was significantly increased (P<0.01). There were no significant differences in all clinical features between FE and iFE patients with ACO phenotype. The fluorescence intensity of CCL3 in sputum macrophages from patients with FE was significantly lower than that in iFE patients (P<0.01); there was no significant difference in CD163 (P>0.05). At the same time, the expression of HIF-1α (P<0.01) and Cav-1(P<0.05) also increased significantly. There was a significant negative correlation between CCL3 and HIF-1α or Cav-1 in all FE and FE patients with CB phenotype. CD163 was only positively correlated with HIF-1α in those patients and FE patients with EM phenotype. There was a significant negative correlation between CCL3 and HIF-1α in FE patients with ACO phenotype, while CD163 was significantly positively correlated with HIF-1α.
 Conclusion: The clinical features of FE or iFE patients with CB, EM or ACO phenotype are different, and M2 in induced sputum from FE patients are dominant. HIF-1α may play a key role in the polarization process.

PMID: 31969502 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Icon for Elsevier Science Related Articles

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heart Failure: A Breathless Conspiracy.

Heart Fail Clin. 2020 Jan;16(1):33-44

Authors: Pellicori P, Cleland JGF, Clark AL

Abstract
Heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both common causes of breathlessness and often conspire to confound accurate diagnosis and optimal therapy. Risk factors (such as aging, smoking, and obesity) and clinical presentation (eg, cough and breathlessness on exertion) can be very similar, but the treatment and prognostic implications are very different. This review discusses the diagnostic challenges in individuals with exertional dyspnea. Also highlighted are the prevalence, clinical relevance, and therapeutic implications of a concurrent diagnosis of COPD and HF.

PMID: 31735313 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Icon for HighWire Related Articles

The Effects of Temperature on Lung Function.

Respir Care. 2019 11;64(11):1454

Authors: Kang G, Zhang H

PMID: 31653768 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Icon for Elsevier Science Related Articles

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing with ventilatory gas analysis for evaluation of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Unmasking its role after a therapeuthic intervention.

Int J Cardiol. 2019 12 01;296:155-156

Authors: Quezada CA, Jiménez D

PMID: 31445674 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Library News

Image result for new

 

WMUH Library Discovery Tool

Check out our guide for a brief overview, how to access and use the Discovery tool. Trouble accessing or have questions?  Please contact us

BMJ Best Practice, clinical decision support tool is now available. Access it on the Trust intranet without any password, to access remotely login with NHS OpenAthens, download the app to access on mobile devices anywhere. See the  user guide for details.

Accessing Articles
Articles from journals marked in green are freely available or available in print in the library, or are available by using your NHS Athens account. You may need to click on 'Log in with Athens' to get an Athens login box.

If you don't have an NHS Athens account, you can register online, and if you do this on an NHS PC, you'll receive a confirmation email the same day.

Journals marked in orange aren't available online, but we hold print copies in the Library.

Journals marked in red aren't available online or in the Library but we can order articles  via our Inter Library Loan Service. There is a small charge for this. Please contact the library on ext 5968 or email Library.InfoService@chelwest.nhs.uk  for more information.

Quick Links
qrcode.14118297[1]