Paediatric Dermatology – Pubmed Results

Related Articles

Acne and social media: A cross-sectional study of content quality on TikTok.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Zheng DX, Ning AY, Levoska MA, Xiang L, Wong C, Scott JF

Abstract
Our objective was to assess the quality of acne-related medical information present on TikTok, the world's fastest growing social media platform. We queried the TikTok mobile application for videos tagged with "#acne" on May 1, 2020, and assessed the top 100 videos meeting inclusion criteria for content quality using DISCERN, a validated and reliable instrument for evaluating consumer health information. The mean content quality rating of videos was 2.03 (SD 0.47) which, according to the DISCERN instrument, indicates information with serious to potentially important shortcomings. Dermatologists should be aware that adolescents are using TikTok to gather acne-related information, and should prioritize acne education in this patient demographic due to the generally low content quality of such information.

PMID: 33247602 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Disseminated cutaneous tuberculosis from BCG vaccination site in an immunocompetent child.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Dhar S, Ganjoo S, Dhar S, Srinivas SM

Abstract
A healthy 4-month-old girl presented with widespread scaly papules and a nodule over the site of BCG immunization. A diagnosis of disseminated cutaneous tuberculosis in an immunocompetent child was confirmed with biopsy. The child was treated with antituberculosis therapy without recurrence.

PMID: 33247503 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Distal-type epitheloid sarcoma mimicking a wart in a child: A diagnosis not to be missed.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 27;:

Authors: George K, Morren MA, Christen T, Letovanec I, Christen-Zaech S

Abstract
Epithelioid sarcoma is a rare soft-tissue tumor that occurs mainly in children and young adults. It typically presents as a subcutaneous or deep dermal mass in distal extremities. Due to its benign-appearing clinical presentation, infrequent occurrence, and histologic similarities with other pathologies, the diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma in its early stages can be extremely difficult and can be easily confused with benign lesions such as warts or foreign body granuloma. In this paper, we report the case of a 12-year-old boy with a distal-type epithelioid sarcoma of the hand and wish to emphasize the difficulties of diagnosing this potentially lethal tumor both clinically and histologically.

PMID: 33247494 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Clinical features of recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Liakos W, Xu A, Finelt N

Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The characteristics of patients experiencing recurrent Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) are not well understood. We aimed to characterize patients with recurrent disease by comparing the demographics, skin and mucosal involvement, seasonality, and treatment to those with single episodes (isolated MIRM).
METHODS: This retrospective case series screened all patients seen by our dermatology inpatient consult service from September 2014 to March 2020. Cases were selected based on laboratory and clinical criteria that confirmed a diagnosis of MIRM.
RESULTS: We identified 13 patients with MIRM: 5 who experienced recurrence (38%) and 8 with isolated, single episodes without recurrence. Mean age was 13.6 years for initial episodes in the recurrent patients compared to 11.7 in patients with isolated episodes. All 5 recurrent MIRM patients were male (compared with 75% of isolated MIRM patients) and predominantly Black (60%, compared with 25%). Most episodes overall (isolated and recurrent) occurred from the months of October to February. Recurrences after initial MIRM episode had less severe skin and mucosal findings, often involving only one mucous membrane, less frequent need for hospital admission, and shorter duration of hospital stay. Prophylactic treatments and treatments beyond supportive care were of unclear value.
CONCLUSIONS: Some characteristics of MIRM differ between patients with recurrent and isolated disease. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for recurrence, which occurred in 38% of our cohort. Although recurrences after initial MIRM episode tended to be less severe, there is still potential for prolonged hospitalizations with recurrent episodes. More evidence is needed regarding effective preventive and treatment regimens in patients with recurrent MIRM.

PMID: 33247484 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Characterization of wound microbes in epidermolysis bullosa: Results from the epidermolysis bullosa clinical characterization and outcomes database.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Levin LE, Shayegan LH, Lucky AW, Hook KP, Bruckner AL, Feinstein JA, Whittier S, Lauren CT, Pope E, Lara-Corrales I, Wiss K, McCuaig CC, Powell J, Eichenfield LF, Levy ML, Diaz L, Glick SA, Paller AS, Price HN, Browning JC, Morel KD

Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) require care of wounds that are colonized or infected with bacteria. A subset of EB patients are at risk for squamous cell carcinoma, and bacterial-host interactions have been considered in this risk. The EB Clinical Characterization and Outcomes Database serves as a repository of information from EB patients at multiple centers in the United States and Canada. Access to this resource enabled broad-scale analysis of wound cultures.
METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 739 wound cultures from 158 patients from 13 centers between 2001 and 2018.
RESULTS: Of 152 patients with a positive culture, Staphylococcus aureus (SA) was recovered from 131 patients (86%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) from 56 (37%), and Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) from 34 (22%). Sixty-eight percent of patients had cultures positive for methicillin-sensitive SA, and 47%, methicillin-resistant SA (18 patients had cultures that grew both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant SA at different points in time). Of 15 patients with SA-positive cultures with recorded mupirocin susceptibility testing, 11 had mupirocin-susceptible SA and 6 patients mupirocin-resistant SA (2 patients grew both mupirocin-susceptible and mupirocin-resistant SA). SCC was reported in 23 patients in the entire database, of whom 10 had documented wound cultures positive for SA, PA, and Proteus species in 90%, 50%, and 20% of cases, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: SA and PA were the most commonly isolated bacteria from wounds. Methicillin resistance and mupirocin resistance were reported in 47% and 40% of patients tested, respectively, highlighting the importance of ongoing antimicrobial strategies to limit antibiotic resistance.

PMID: 33247481 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

US Prescription trends of antihistamines for atopic dermatitis, 2011-2016.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 27;:

Authors: Garg S, Zhao J, Tegtmeyer K, Shah P, Lio PA

Abstract
Antihistamine use for primary treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) is not recommended, but current guidelines state that sedating antihistamines are favored over non-sedating antihistamines for relief of burdensome pruritus. We analyzed the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data to compare use of antihistamines between dermatologists and non-dermatologists. Overall, dermatologists are more likely to prescribe sedating than non-sedating antihistamines when compared to non-dermatologists (P < .001, δabs  = 0.45). Patients under 21 years old (P = .03, δabs  = 0.10) and Black patients (P < .001, δabs  = 0.19) were also more likely to receive sedating antihistamines than non-sedating antihistamines. These findings highlight the differential prescribing practices for atopic dermatitis among physicians.

PMID: 33247474 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Erythema multiforme-like eruption associated with plant-induced allergic contact dermatitis in a pediatric patient: A case report.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Cattelan L, Zargham H, Sasseville D, Maedler Kron C, Jafarian F

Abstract
An 11-year-old boy presented to the emergency department 5 days after playing in the forest. His initial eruption, consistent with allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy, progressed into target lesions involving his extremities, palms, upper trunk, and face, consistent with an erythema multiforme-like eruption. This report details the case and reviews the literature concerning this atypical and potentially underreported complication of plant-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

PMID: 33247467 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Occlusive treatment enhances efficacy of tacrolimus 0.1% in a pediatric patient with severe alopecia areata: Case report and literature review.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 27;:

Authors: Bimbi C, Kyriakou G, Wollina U

Abstract
Tacrolimus is an immunomodulatory drug, available for topical and systemic treatment of several dermopathies that are characterized by immune dysregulation. In the case of alopecia areata, standard application has proven insufficient to yield satisfactory results. Herein, we present a 6-year-old patient with Down syndrome who was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1% ointment under occlusion overnight with remarkable clinical improvement within 4 months.

PMID: 33247446 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Carpet beetle dermatitis mimicking bullous impetigo.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 27;:

Authors: Gumina ME, Yan AC

Abstract
A 13-year-old female patient presented with a 3-month history of recurrent blisters, which ruptured into multiple superficial erosions with overlying crust located on the face, neck, and shoulder. Treatment for presumed bullous impetigo showed no benefit. Samples collected from the patient's home revealed the presence of numerous carpet beetles in a wool rug. Carpet beetle dermatitis resembles papular urticaria but may occasionally present as skin lesions resembling bullous impetigo.

PMID: 33247445 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Dupilumab for pediatric prurigo nodularis: A case report.

Pediatr Dermatol. 2020 Nov 28;:

Authors: Fachler T, Maria Faitataziadou S, Molho-Pessach V

Abstract
Herein we report on a 9-year-old girl with recalcitrant prurigo nodularis unresponsive to multiple standard treatments. She was started on dupilumab therapy with rapid improvement in pruritus within 2 weeks and near complete regression of lesions at 3 months. Dupilumab should be considered as an off-label treatment for refractory prurigo nodularis in children.

PMID: 33247435 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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